Confederate Naval Vessels

For anything not in the above. Ground combat/personal combat. Anything to do with CS, but not already covered.
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Grant
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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Grant » Tue Apr 23, 2013 5:18 pm

looking good carthaginian!!!! Really. love the naval vessels. don't get enough coverage in Crimson Skies.

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Carthaginian
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David Llewellyn class Destroyer

Postby Carthaginian » Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:15 am

The last warship that I will do for a while... till I can find the money involved.
Don't want to get too outlandish.

The David Llewellyn class destroyer was designed to get hulls in the water- and the Confederate Navy is shameless about this. They are not the best vessels that could have been built- the Bureau of Ships knew it when the designed them it, the men in the yards knew it while they built them, and the officers and men knew it when they took them to sea. They were designed to be constructed quickly and cost as little as possible; the goal of twelve hulls in the water was met in only two years, and at a cost of only $30 million old US dollars. The vessels were all immediately transferred into the Gulf of Mexico in order to 'maintain a homogenous fleet'- a politic way of saying 'grouping inferior ships in a low-intensity theater.' Against the the ships of Texas (where the navy is considered a sideline) and Louisiana (which can't afford any new vessels), they are sufficient... but little else.
Constructed using the last of the spare 5"/L25's that were in stock, they lack the range of a fleet destroyer. They also feature only three gun tubes- considerably less firepower than most vessels currently being commissioned. They do possess a very heavy anti-aircraft armament, making them very useful as escorts in the confined waters of the Gulf... where a ship is almost always in range of hostile air bases. They also feature a heavy anti-submarine armament, in order to deal with the ever-present coastal submarines favored by Louisiana as a low-cost way of attacking enemy shipping.
Their final 'offensive' feature has nothing to do with weapons... it is the name of the lead ship of the class, which was named after the ship's surgeon of the C.S.S. Alabama- Dr. David Herbert Llewellyn. Possibly the most selfless of the crew, the good Doctor gave up a seat in a lifeboat in order to allow his wounded charges to be evacuated. What no one but Dr. Llewellyn knew was that he had never learned to swim, and was heroically consigning himself to drown to allow his shipmates to escape the same fate. Both Texas and the Empire State find this choice of name insufferable, as the Doctor was a subject of the British Crown; they feel that this is an intentional move on the part of the Confederacy to showcase their growing ties to the British Empire.


David Llewellyn, Confederation of Dixie Destroyer laid down 1934

Displacement:
1,155 t light; 1,220 t standard; 1,350 t normal; 1,454 t full load

Dimensions: Length (overall / waterline) x beam x draught (normal/deep)
(310.00 ft / 300.00 ft) x 30.00 ft x (11.00 / 11.62 ft)
(94.49 m / 91.44 m) x 9.14 m x (3.35 / 3.54 m)

Armament:
3 - 5.00" / 127 mm 25.0 cal guns - 56.77lbs / 25.75kg shells, 300 per gun
Quick firing guns in deck and hoist mounts, 1921 Model
1 x Single mount on centreline, forward deck forward
1 x Twin mount on centreline, aft deck aft
6 - 1.57" / 40.0 mm 39.0 cal guns - 2.00lbs / 0.91kg shells, 1,500 per gun
Anti-air guns in deck mounts, 1934 Model
2 x Twin mounts on sides, forward deck aft
2 raised mounts
1 x Twin mount on centreline, aft deck forward
1 raised mount
Weight of broadside 182 lbs / 83 kg
Main Torpedoes
4 - 21.0" / 533 mm, 22.50 ft / 6.86 m torpedoes - 1.507 t each, 6.027 t total
In 1 sets of deck mounted centre rotating tubes
Main DC/AS Mortars
2 - 420.00 lbs / 190.51 kg Depth Charges + 20 reloads - 4.125 t total
in Stern depth charge racks

Armour:
- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 1.00" / 25 mm - -

- Conning towers: Forward 2.00" / 51 mm, Aft 0.00" / 0 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Direct drive, 2 shafts, 19,000 shp / 14,174 Kw = 28.00 kts
Range 3,350nm at 15.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 234 tons

Complement:
110 - 144

Cost:
£0.621 million / $2.485 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 42 tons, 3.1 %
- Guns: 25 tons, 1.9 %
- Weapons: 17 tons, 1.3 %
Armour: 10 tons, 0.8 %
- Armament: 5 tons, 0.4 %
- Conning Tower: 5 tons, 0.4 %
Machinery: 547 tons, 40.5 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 527 tons, 39.1 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 195 tons, 14.5 %
Miscellaneous weights: 28 tons, 2.1 %
- Hull above water: 20 tons
- On freeboard deck: 8 tons

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
853 lbs / 387 Kg = 13.7 x 5.0 " / 127 mm shells or 0.3 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.23
Metacentric height 1.2 ft / 0.4 m
Roll period: 11.5 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 50 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.33
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 0.88

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has rise forward of midbreak,
a normal bow and a cruiser stern
Block coefficient (normal/deep): 0.477 / 0.487
Length to Beam Ratio: 10.00 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 17.32 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 65 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 57
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 19.30 degrees
Stern overhang: 3.00 ft / 0.91 m
Freeboard (% = length of deck as a percentage of waterline length):
Fore end, Aft end
- Forecastle: 20.00 %, 20.00 ft / 6.10 m, 17.00 ft / 5.18 m
- Forward deck: 20.00 %, 17.00 ft / 5.18 m, 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
- Aft deck: 45.00 %, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m
- Quarter deck: 15.00 %, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m
- Average freeboard: 11.74 ft / 3.58 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 141.7 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 94.7 %
Waterplane Area: 5,876 Square feet or 546 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 110 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 50 lbs/sq ft or 246 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0.90
- Longitudinal: 2.25
- Overall: 0.99
Cramped machinery, storage, compartmentation space
Adequate accommodation and workspace room
Poor seaboat, wet and uncomfortable, reduced performance in heavy weather
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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lupo
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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby lupo » Sun May 12, 2013 5:57 pm

first thought was "what the fuck" as I'm curently working on some Confed-Navs-Stuff myself ;) ...way not as detailed as yours. I made up fighter-designs for being used on the carrier as well as squadrons/organisation and stuff (and I'm about to field 'em in a little campaign.

What I've red so far sounds very good and thought throu...let me ask: Do you have something to do with shipping? Your vokabulary sounds familiar...I'm curently studying nautics (becoming shipsmate...), you know? :mrgreen: So you're from the business as well?



cheers
the road to hell is full
of good intentions!
---Bruce Dickinson

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Carthaginian
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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Carthaginian » Tue May 14, 2013 4:12 am

lupo wroteColonfirst thought was "what the fuck" as I'm curently working on some Confed-Navs-Stuff myself ;) ...way not as detailed as yours. I made up fighter-designs for being used on the carrier as well as squadrons/organisation and stuff (and I'm about to field 'em in a little campaign.

What I've red so far sounds very good and thought throu...let me ask: Do you have something to do with shipping? Your vokabulary sounds familiar...I'm curently studying nautics (becoming shipsmate...), you know? :mrgreen: So you're from the business as well?

cheers


Lupo,

Nope.
I'm not involved in the maritime trade in any professional manner.
The largest vessel I've ever conned was a 20' outboard powerboat.
I am, by trade, a Nurse... though I was also a Military Police soldier in the National Guard for 9 years.
If my Duetsch isn't too rusty*, that would translate to a Feldjäger Stabsunteroffizier.

I simply am a strong enthusiast when it comes to naval matters. I read up on it a great deal, and enjoy designing and drawing ships (poorly, most of the time) in my spare time. I own the 'Fleet Type Submarine'- which is basically the instructional manual for the USN's WWII era submarine fleet, detailing the operation of most of the equipment aboard the old diesel-electric boats in the USN. I play a lot of submarine simulation games, and understand tactics and weapons employment for subs of the pre-nuclear era pretty well for an amateur. I also hold a great deal of respect for naval personnel, in spite of my own professional pride as a former soldier. ;)
My grandfather was a boilerman on a WWII gun cruiser- the U.S.S. Toledo. He also worked as a civilian mariner, though his experience in that capacity was primarily on in-shore pushboats/towboats. He knew a lot about the local river- having him aboard a small fishing boat was better than a full set of charts. In his lifetime, he forgot more about the operation and construction of small vessels (<10m) than I will ever be able to learn. I miss the old 'squid' dearly. :(
I do hope to earn enough money (by retirement age) to purchase a small live-aboard vessel of about 15-20m, and am equipping myself with such skills as to be able to sail her locally; I live on the Gulf Coast of Alabama, and there are a lot of nice places within range of such a boat. There are many fishing vessels in the area that would be easily converted to such duty, and they can generally be had for reasonable prices (60,000 euros is not out of the question).

My little experiment here is to create a realistic navy for a nation with the resources and budget that the Confederacy might have. It will not be nearly as large as Crimson Skies seems to suggest that a nation that size might be able to afford- as the setting seems to ignore all realistic limitations upon funding the militaries it describes. Such a Confederate Navy would probably be no larger than the Kriegsmarine of WWII, though the tonnage would be divided a bit differently... the Confederacy would focus more on protecting commerce and sea lanes of communications, and would probably function almost as an extension of the British Royal Navy during wartime.
As the Confederation of Dixie would depend largely upon overseas trade at the time in question (our manufacturing base was only beginning to develop in the late '30's), cruisers would be in high demand. The problem is that the Confederacy had few of these vessels based in its borders at the time the United States broke up... and that the United States itself was woefully under-supplied with vessels of this type during the 30's in the first place! The Confederacy would have to construct such vessels themselves- a long and expensive process. In the meantime, they would probably trade ships they had little use for to other North American nations in order to obtain them. As the bulk of the Atlantic Fleet was stationed in Norfolk, Virginia, the Confederacy would have ample ships to preform such trades... and would lack the manpower or revenue to operate them, anyway.
One could essentially staff two Brooklyn class light cruisers (15 x 6" guns) for the same manpower that it took to staff one New Mexico class battleship (12 x 14" guns), and the former could cover more patrol area than the latter- important for a nation protecting shipping lanes. Additionally, the cruisers would be faster and cheaper to construct, and would require less in upkeep.

This is the kind of logic I'm trying to employ here... what kind of fleet would actually work in a real-world setting for the Confederation of Dixie.

If you are working on such a thing yourself, I could help you to find ships that might actually be available to the Confederacy for use in your scenarios... and am VERY willing to take advice or accept input on what you think ships used by the Confederacy might look like. Indeed, I see the Confederacy working much like the Hochseeflotte- focusing more on a harassment-based policy, with any battleships possessed being smaller than their contemporaries... even to the point of having the crews bunk ashore most of the time, and featuring little more than a place for the ratings to sling hammocks for short sorties- much like the very early German navy did.


My German language skills are limited to knowing equivalent ranks and understanding some military unit designations (mostly obsolete WWI/WWII or Cold War era), ordering in restraints/bars, being able to read a train schedule, and asking the Polizei how much it would cost to get a detained soldier out of lockup before he was considered AWOL. :D
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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Carthaginian
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LocationCOLON Daphne, Alabama, Confederation of Dixie

Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Carthaginian » Tue May 14, 2013 4:17 am

PS, I am very privileged to live within 'engagement range' of the guns of this beautiful old lady.
Spent part of the evening today fishing off a pier under the watchful gaze of her and her companions.

Image
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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Carthaginian
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LocationCOLON Daphne, Alabama, Confederation of Dixie

Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Carthaginian » Tue May 28, 2013 10:44 pm

A class of coastal tanker, built to specifications determined by Lykes Brothers Steamship Company. The governments of Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida all subsidized two units each at 40% with the condition that they could be conscripted into service with the Confederate Navy during time of war. So far, they are all in service with Lykes Lines under house names and have not been pressed- though increasing tensions in the Dixie-ISA/Empire State-Appalachia conflict could mean that the Lykes house might be light six small tankers rather quickly.

Provisions for three 1.5" AA guns are made, but the guns are not fitted; their weight is included in the miscellaneous weights.

Tallahatchie, Confederation of Dixie Coastal Tanker laid down 1935

Displacement:
2,041 t light; 2,086 t standard; 2,250 t normal; 2,381 t full load

Dimensions: Length (overall / waterline) x beam x draught (normal/deep)
(225.00 ft / 225.00 ft) x 38.00 ft x (16.00 / 16.77 ft)
(68.58 m / 68.58 m) x 11.58 m x (4.88 / 5.11 m)

Machinery:
Diesel Internal combustion motors,
Direct drive, 1 shaft, 600 shp / 448 Kw = 10.10 kts
Range 8,100nm at 10.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 294 tons

Complement:
163 - 212

Cost:
£0.376 million / $1.504 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 0 tons, 0.0 %
Machinery: 17 tons, 0.8 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 419 tons, 18.6 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 209 tons, 9.3 %
Miscellaneous weights: 1,605 tons, 71.3 %
- Hull below water: 790 tons
- Hull above water: 790 tons
- On freeboard deck: 15 tons
- Above deck: 10 tons

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
2,252 lbs / 1,022 Kg = 20.9 x 6 " / 152 mm shells or 0.9 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.19
Metacentric height 1.6 ft / 0.5 m
Roll period: 12.5 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 88 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.00
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1.77

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has raised forecastle, raised quarterdeck ,
a normal bow and a cruiser stern
Block coefficient (normal/deep): 0.576 / 0.581
Length to Beam Ratio: 5.92 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 15.00 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 31 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 0.00 degrees
Stern overhang: 0.00 ft / 0.00 m
Freeboard (% = length of deck as a percentage of waterline length):
Fore end, Aft end
- Forecastle: 20.00 %, 14.00 ft / 4.27 m, 10.00 ft / 3.05 m
- Forward deck: 30.00 %, 6.00 ft / 1.83 m, 6.00 ft / 1.83 m
- Aft deck: 30.00 %, 6.00 ft / 1.83 m, 6.00 ft / 1.83 m
- Quarter deck: 20.00 %, 14.00 ft / 4.27 m, 14.00 ft / 4.27 m
- Average freeboard: 8.72 ft / 2.66 m
Ship tends to be wet forward

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 79.2 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 41.7 %
Waterplane Area: 5,954 Square feet or 553 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 137 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 45 lbs/sq ft or 219 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0.93
- Longitudinal: 1.91
- Overall: 1.00
Excellent machinery, storage, compartmentation space
Extremely poor accommodation and workspace room
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform
Excellent seaboat, comfortable, rides out heavy weather easily

1580 tons liquid cargo space

Barrels per Ton for General Cargo:
8.5 - Gasoline = 13,430 bbl
7.8 - Kerosine = 12,324 bbl
7.5 - Diesel Fuel = 11,850 bbl
6.7 - Fuel Oil = 10,586 bbl


NOTE: the crew figures here are complete bollocks.
Figure about 1/3 that number for this vessel: 54 - 70 (peacetime/wartime)
Additionally, the costs should be substantially reduced; merchants are not built as heavily as warships.
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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foxmalcolm
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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby foxmalcolm » Wed May 29, 2013 1:17 am

Nice you live near the berth of the Alabama.

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Carthaginian
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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Carthaginian » Wed May 29, 2013 6:15 am

The Confederacy, on the 'advice' of their British allies, are producing 12 of these small vessels. Designed to place 240 troops on an invasion beach in a single trip, the LCI is the smallest troop-carrier that Dixie has that cand 'ride its own bottom' to the target. They will be propelled by six big Moon Motors "8D8" diesels (pronounced 'eight-dee-eight'; each of the eight cylinders was 8" in diameter), three per shaft. The 800 SHP/14.5 knots figure is a conservative peacetime estimate- during combat, the engines can be run ungoverned and the ship could make 16 knots for short periods of time.
The vessels are to be produced by the Confederate Navy and immediately transferred over to several municipalities for use as passenger ferries, with the option to recall them to active duty in the event of conflict. As the cities will be paying for the upkeep on the vessels during the meantime, the Navy will be free to spend that money on other things. Mobile, Alabama has requested two of the vessels specifically to handle traffic between the Fairhope community and Mobile. These vessels will, when delivered, raise the amount of people that can be transported across the bay by nearly 35%- and will do so more quickly and cheaply than the old steamers that currently run the route. Virginia also purchased several of the vessels, four to work between Newport News and Norfolk, and two each between Hampton and Portsmouth and Norfolk.

LCI-01, Confederation of Dixie Infantry Landing Craft laid down 1938

Displacement:
287 t light; 296 t standard; 350 t normal; 394 t full load

Dimensions: Length (overall / waterline) x beam x draught (normal/deep)
(165.00 ft / 160.00 ft) x 24.00 ft x (6.00 / 6.58 ft)
(50.29 m / 48.77 m) x 7.32 m x (1.83 / 2.01 m)

Armament:
5 - 0.70" / 17.8 mm 60.0 cal guns - 0.20lbs / 0.09kg shells, 2,000 per gun
Machine guns in deck mounts, 1938 Model
1 x Single mount on centreline, forward deck forward
4 x Single mounts on sides, evenly spread
Weight of broadside 1 lbs / 0 kg

Armour:
- Box over machinery & magazines:
1.00" / 25 mm

- Conning towers: Forward 1.00" / 25 mm, Aft 0.00" / 0 mm

Machinery:
Diesel Internal combustion motors,
Direct drive, 2 shafts, 800 shp / 597 Kw = 14.47 kts
Range 5,150nm at 12.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 98 tons

Complement:
39 - 52

Cost:
£0.075 million / $0.300 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 0 tons, 0.1 %
- Guns: 0 tons, 0.1 %
Armour: 24 tons, 6.8 %
- Armour Deck: 23 tons, 6.5 %
- Conning Tower: 1 tons, 0.3 %
Machinery: 22 tons, 6.3 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 116 tons, 33.2 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 63 tons, 17.9 %
Miscellaneous weights: 125 tons, 35.7 %
- Hull above water: 124 tons
- On freeboard deck: 1 tons

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
931 lbs / 422 Kg = 5,426.4 x 0.7 " / 18 mm shells or 0.8 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.40
Metacentric height 1.1 ft / 0.3 m
Roll period: 9.8 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 50 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.00
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1.73

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has raised forecastle,
a normal bow and a cruiser stern
Block coefficient (normal/deep): 0.532 / 0.545
Length to Beam Ratio: 6.67 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 12.65 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 52 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 29
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 13.00 degrees
Stern overhang: 2.00 ft / 0.61 m
Freeboard (% = length of deck as a percentage of waterline length):
Fore end, Aft end
- Forecastle: 15.00 %, 13.00 ft / 3.96 m, 11.00 ft / 3.35 m
- Forward deck: 30.00 %, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m
- Aft deck: 35.00 %, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m
- Quarter deck: 20.00 %, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m
- Average freeboard: 8.57 ft / 2.61 m
Ship tends to be wet forward

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 60.6 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 102.9 %
Waterplane Area: 2,634 Square feet or 245 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 180 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 28 lbs/sq ft or 138 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0.90
- Longitudinal: 2.55
- Overall: 1.00
Excellent machinery, storage, compartmentation space
Adequate accommodation and workspace room
Excellent seaboat, comfortable, can fire her guns in the heaviest weather
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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Carthaginian
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LocationCOLON Daphne, Alabama, Confederation of Dixie

Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Carthaginian » Wed May 29, 2013 6:52 am

foxmalcolm wroteColonNice you live near the berth of the Alabama.


LOL... 'berth' isn't an entirely accurate word, Fox.
That would imply she actually sits in water.
Lucky A has a draft of right at 11m... and my charts shows her in just about 2m of water. :oops: In fact, she is rusting at a rather alarming rate- her bottom looks like a patchwork quilt, continually replaced from the inside as best as can be done. She is in most desperate need of a drydock or she'll wind up like the Cerberus down in your part of the world. It is truly a shame how we treat these grand old ladies. Unfortunately, it would cost millions to get her to a dock that could accommodate her, as I do not believe any of the facilities in Mobile could accommodate a lady with such a 'full figure' (though the recent accommodation of the MV Carnival Triumph makes you think they might just be able to fit her).

She and Drum are a pleasure to walk around, though. I will be going again this summer as I do every year- I'll try to be picture intensive and post some here for those who want a look-see. I've also recently gotten a now job that will allow me to volunteer on the Drum as a 'shipmate' (read as 'scraper, painter, cook and bottle washer') should the old squids decide they want to let a soldier play.
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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Thom
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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Thom » Thu May 30, 2013 3:10 am

I love the landing craft!
Flying the Crimson Skies


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