Confederate Naval Vessels

For anything not in the above. Ground combat/personal combat. Anything to do with CS, but not already covered.
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Carthaginian
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Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Carthaginian » Mon Apr 01, 2013 12:58 pm

Ok... I'm going to be designing some original vessels for the Confederate Navy here.
Don't come here expecting to see monster battleships or supercarriers- those don't particularly fit Dixie's needs. What you're going to be seeing here are ships which focus on commerce protection (and, consequently, also interdiction of the same). Dixie's lifeblood is its import/export network- and this is what any enemy would attack during a protracted war. Nations like the Appalachia, People's Collective and even Texas would have problems fighting Dixie because they would have difficulty managing to sever ties to European imports. The Empire State, however, could make this kind of thing happen- as could several foreign adversaries like Russia and Germany.

The Confederate Navy will follow the model of what could be called a 'Cruiser Navy'- focusing on sub-capital ships in an effort to maximize the number of vessels in operation. Maybe 'Cruiser Navy +' would be a better term, because there will also be several classes of submarine included... though they are a bit more pricy than other ships their size (displacement), they would work well in the choke points of the Gulf, and never be too far from resupply. The Confederacy will be notably lacking in battleships and fleet carriers (initially, they would need carriers in a wartime environment) because there is, frankly, no need for these types of vessel. A few 'fast escort' carriers will be considered, but might not even be built.

So, without making peoples' eyes glaze over any more than I already have, here's the Navy of the Confederation of Dixie:
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Carthaginian » Mon Apr 01, 2013 1:01 pm

Facts and Figures:
Forthcoming
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Carthaginian » Mon Apr 01, 2013 1:04 pm

Warships by Classification:
Escorts
1931 Moses Dallas
Torpedo Boats
Destroyers
Light Cruisers
Heavy Cruisers
Gyro Carriers
1932 Kitty Hawk

Submarines by Classification:
Coastal Submarines
Ocean-Going Submarines

Support Ships by Classification:
Mine Warfare Vessels
Supply/Depot Vessels
Tenders and Auxiliaries
Last edited by 5 on Carthaginian, edited 0 times in total.
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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Moses Dallas class Escort

Postby Carthaginian » Mon Apr 01, 2013 1:28 pm

Moses Dallas class
These vessels were extremely controversial at the outset of their careers... but not for their designs, which were conservative and well-planned. They were considered controversial because the entire class of vessel was named for colored sailors during the failed bid for independence in the 1860s. Though their heroism was no less than that of their white counterparts- and indeed, was often greater- the climate in many parts of Dixie meant that naming any naval vessel (even one so inconsequential as an escort vessel) after a Negro was unthinkable. Since then, several more ships- including the new destroyer David White- have been so named, but in '31 this was a very risque move on the part of the Navy Department. It payed off though, as the number of colored recruits for the Navy nearly tripled in the first three years; they now make up 38% of the active-duty Navy and between 12% and 40% of the Naval Militias of each State. Of the 12 vessels in the Moses Dallas class, 7have all Negro crews; the remaining ships have a mixed crew with white officers.

The Charles Cleaper, James Hicks and Joe Johnson- having all Negro crews- distinguished themselves in action against pirates off the coast of Puerto Rico while conducting patrols in the Caribbean in 1935. The three ship downed no less than 4 aircraft between them, and fought off multiple attacks from small surface vessels. During one engagement on this patrol, Able Seaman Rodger Turner became the first Negro to receive the Southern Cross (Valor). A pirate boarding party managed to make it aboard the Hicks just forward of the 5" gun. To put the weapon out of commission, one of the pirates lobbed a grenade atop the platform. Upon seeing the grenade, Able Seaman Turner- with no regard to his own safety- picked up the grenade and jumped over the edge of the platform atop the pirates. Though he was killed by the explosion, he killed or injured several of the pirates, and caused their remaining comrades to retreat back to their motor boat. The crew of the Hicks then destroyed the speedboat- no survivors were found.

Image

Moses Dallas, Confederate States of America Escort laid down 1931

Displacement:
570 t light; 600 t standard; 700 t normal; 780 t full load

Dimensions: Length (overall / waterline) x beam x draught (normal/deep)
(250.00 ft / 245.00 ft) x 25.00 ft x (10.00 / 10.74 ft)
(76.20 m / 74.68 m) x 7.62 m x (3.05 / 3.27 m)

Armament:
1 - 5.00" / 127 mm 25.0 cal gun - 55.01lbs / 24.95kg shells, 250 per gun
Quick firing gun in deck and hoist mount, 1926 Model
1 x Single mount on centreline, aft deck aft
1 raised mount aft
2 - 3.00" / 76.2 mm 23.0 cal guns - 13.01lbs / 5.90kg shells, 400 per gun
Quick firing guns in deck mounts, 1913 Model
2 x Single mounts on sides, forward deck forward
12 - 0.50" / 12.7 mm 90.0 cal guns - 0.09lbs / 0.04kg shells, 5,000 per gun
Machine guns in deck mounts, 1919 Model
2 x Twin mounts on sides, forward deck aft
2 raised mounts
4 x Twin mounts on sides, aft evenly spread
4 raised mounts
Weight of broadside 82 lbs / 37 kg
Main DC/AS Mortars
2 - 420.00 lbs / 190.51 kg Depth Charges + 20 reloads - 4.125 t total
in Stern depth charge racks

Machinery:
Diesel Internal combustion motors,
Geared drive, 2 shafts, 3,400 shp / 2,537 Kw = 20.01 kts
Range 4,400nm at 14.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 180 tons

Complement:
67 - 88

Cost:
£0.167 million / $0.668 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 17 tons, 2.4 %
- Guns: 12 tons, 1.7 %
- Weapons: 5 tons, 0.7 %
Machinery: 102 tons, 14.5 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 339 tons, 48.4 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 130 tons, 18.6 %
Miscellaneous weights: 112 tons, 16.0 %
- Hull below water: 50 tons
- Hull above water: 50 tons
- On freeboard deck: 10 tons
- Above deck: 2 tons

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
1,414 lbs / 641 Kg = 22.6 x 5.0 " / 127 mm shells or 0.8 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.11
Metacentric height 0.8 ft / 0.2 m
Roll period: 12.0 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 70 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.68
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 2.00

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has rise forward of midbreak,
a normal bow and a cruiser stern
Block coefficient (normal/deep): 0.400 / 0.415
Length to Beam Ratio: 9.80 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 15.65 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 49 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 35
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 15.53 degrees
Stern overhang: 0.00 ft / 0.00 m
Freeboard (% = length of deck as a percentage of waterline length):
Fore end, Aft end
- Forecastle: 20.00 %, 18.00 ft / 5.49 m, 17.00 ft / 5.18 m
- Forward deck: 25.00 %, 17.00 ft / 5.18 m, 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
- Aft deck: 40.00 %, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m
- Quarter deck: 15.00 %, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m, 8.00 ft / 2.44 m
- Average freeboard: 12.01 ft / 3.66 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 70.9 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 120.8 %
Waterplane Area: 3,770 Square feet or 350 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 197 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 41 lbs/sq ft or 201 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0.83
- Longitudinal: 5.15
- Overall: 1.00
Excellent machinery, storage, compartmentation space
Excellent accommodation and workspace room
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform
Excellent seaboat, comfortable, can fire her guns in the heaviest weather

Moses Dallas
Ben Newell
William Bugg
James Moore
Edward Weeks
Benjamen Gray
David Green
Henry Leonard
James Price
Charles Cleaper
James Hicks
Joe Johnson
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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Carthaginian
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Kitty Hawk class Gyro Carrier

Postby Carthaginian » Sat Apr 06, 2013 2:33 am

*placeholder text*
The Kitty Hawk class is a group of three small carriers designed to provide light air support for the Confederacy's fleet. With three vessels in the class, two can remain available for operations at all times. Carrying 18 autogyros- which can act as either CAP or spotter/bombers- the vessels are affordable and versatile ships which have a good future in the Confederate fleet. The ships were built with durability in mind, with a 2" thick armored deck and astounding torpedo protection- a 1 and 1/2" thick torpedo bulkhead backed by a layer of concrete totaling 500 tons on either beam. A single elevator transports craft to the deck, and the pilothouse is below the forward edge of the flight deck in order to ensure an unobstructed landing zone.
The Kitty Hawk entered service in early 1935, the Pernsacola in late 1936 and the Biloxi is scheduled to enter service in December 1937.

*line art forthcoming*

Kitty Hawk, Confederation of Dixie Gryo Carrier laid down 1932

Displacement:
6,711 t light; 6,900 t standard; 7,250 t normal; 7,530 t full load

Dimensions: Length (overall / waterline) x beam x draught (normal/deep)
(450.00 ft / 450.00 ft) x 55.00 ft x (20.00 / 20.59 ft)
(137.16 m / 137.16 m) x 16.76 m x (6.10 / 6.28 m)

Armament:
12 - 1.57" / 40.0 mm 39.0 cal guns - 2.00lbs / 0.91kg shells, 2,500 per gun
Breech loading guns in deck mounts, 1932 Model
1 x 2 row quad mount on centreline, forward deck forward
2 x 2 row quad mounts on sides, aft deck aft
20 - 0.79" / 20.0 mm 70.0 cal guns - 0.26lbs / 0.12kg shells, 3,500 per gun
Breech loading guns in deck mounts, 1932 Model
10 x Twin mounts on sides, evenly spread
Weight of broadside 29 lbs / 13 kg

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 2.00" / 51 mm 297.00 ft / 90.53 m 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Main Belt covers 102 % of normal length

- Torpedo Bulkhead - Additional damage containing bulkheads:
1.50" / 38 mm 297.00 ft / 90.53 m 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
Beam between torpedo bulkheads 45.00 ft / 13.72 m

- Hull void:
0.00" / 0 mm 0.00 ft / 0.00 m 0.00 ft / 0.00 m

- Armoured deck - multiple decks:
For and Aft decks: 2.00" / 51 mm
Forecastle: 1.00" / 25 mm Quarter deck: 2.00" / 51 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 2 shafts, 18,000 shp / 13,428 Kw = 22.03 kts
Range 7,915nm at 10.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 630 tons

Complement:
392 - 510

Cost:
£1.416 million / $5.665 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 7 tons, 0.1 %
- Guns: 7 tons, 0.1 %
Armour: 1,260 tons, 17.4 %
- Belts: 397 tons, 5.5 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 264 tons, 3.6 %
- Armour Deck: 599 tons, 8.3 %
Machinery: 531 tons, 7.3 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 2,644 tons, 36.5 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 539 tons, 7.4 %
Miscellaneous weights: 2,270 tons, 31.3 %
- Hull below water: 435 tons
- Hull void weights: 1,000 tons
- Hull above water: 435 tons
- On freeboard deck: 400 tons

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
26,719 lbs / 12,119 Kg = 13,682.5 x 1.6 " / 40 mm shells or 6.0 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.25
Metacentric height 3.1 ft / 0.9 m
Roll period: 13.2 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 50 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.01
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 2.00

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has raised forecastle, raised quarterdeck ,
a normal bow and a cruiser stern
Block coefficient (normal/deep): 0.513 / 0.517
Length to Beam Ratio: 8.18 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 21.21 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 47 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 25
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 0.00 degrees
Stern overhang: 0.00 ft / 0.00 m
Freeboard (% = length of deck as a percentage of waterline length):
Fore end, Aft end
- Forecastle: 18.00 %, 40.00 ft / 12.19 m, 40.00 ft / 12.19 m
- Forward deck: 30.00 %, 24.00 ft / 7.32 m, 24.00 ft / 7.32 m
- Aft deck: 36.00 %, 24.00 ft / 7.32 m, 24.00 ft / 7.32 m
- Quarter deck: 16.00 %, 40.00 ft / 12.19 m, 40.00 ft / 12.19 m
- Average freeboard: 29.44 ft / 8.97 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 47.9 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 194.5 %
Waterplane Area: 16,682 Square feet or 1,550 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 157 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 68 lbs/sq ft or 332 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0.81
- Longitudinal: 6.94
- Overall: 1.00
Excellent machinery, storage, compartmentation space
Excellent accommodation and workspace room
Excellent seaboat, comfortable, can fire her guns in the heaviest weather

Kitty Hawk
Pensacola
Biloxi
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Thom » Sat Apr 06, 2013 8:13 pm

Fascinating stuff Carthaginian. You have put a lot of effort into this, well done sir!

In particular. I love the Kitty Hawk class. Gyro Carriers just make so much sense to me, 'specially so if the gyros are dual (float/wheel) landing capable.

Hm m m a flying boat hulled gyro with retractable landing gear, sounds Maritime to me. . .
Flying the Crimson Skies

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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Carthaginian » Sat Apr 06, 2013 8:54 pm

Thanks.
I haven't started crunching dollar signs yet... but as the next couple of weeks at work are whipped and I get settled, I plan on it.
Mostly, I want the CoD to have a cruiser fleet, but a couple of battleships will be necessary to keep the numbers up in the early years (till the end of WWII). Any ships built afterwards will focus on a more
Also, though the CoD has taken control of Newport News, they lack the facilities of the Naval Gun Factory in downtown DC to finish any heavy naval rifles. Actually, at this point in time, the Naval Gun Factory is (IIRC) the ONLY LOCATION ON THE CONTINENT that could finish a large bore naval rifle... say, >6". Thus, any ship built in the Confederacy- or any other American nation, for that matter- will require 1.) active assistance from the government of Colombia 2.) necessitate the importation of heavy guns OR 3.) will have to be a 'light cruiser' or smaller. The existing battleships, especially the later 'Standards,' will be of incomprehensible value to the emerging naval powers of North America. They would take years of labor and materials not necessarily available to those nations (there ain't no iron or coal in Hollywood, babycakes) to replace! Thus, you will see the Confederacy, the Empire State, the Atlantic Coalition, Hollywood and Pacifica will be refitting the holy hell outta the ships they manage to get.
Also, expect a lot of trading to go on among the Nations. The USN basically had no cruisers in the 1920's; we were a battleship fleet, pure and simple. The efforts of the mid-20's and early 30's to remedy that issue took place mostly in New York, Philly and California. Then again, a large part of the battle line was stationed in Virginia or Hawai'i. This means that nations needing cruisers and nations having battleships will likely engage in some 'wheeling and dealing' via neutral Colombia. The Confederacy would Have some valuable commodities in mothballs at Norfolk- for instance, the demilitarized hulk of the North Dakota, which had been used as a target ship. Not sure what kind of shape she'd be in... but she still had a lot of armor plate to be reused, and her turbines were still aboard and functional. That could be traded for payment on a more serviceable vessel.

When you start looking at ships, fleets and shipbuilding- a process that stretches out over years and requires tens of millions of dollars to be invested... the picture begins to look interesting indeed.

EDIT: The Arizona will actually be serving in DIxie on 07DEC41... probably renamed the Virginia. She was refitting in Norfolk when the US collapsed and would have been seized by the Outer Banks, then folded into the Confederate Navy after the assimilation of the Protectorate.
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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Thom
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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Thom » Sat Apr 06, 2013 11:19 pm

Isaacson Steel of Seattle WA (AKA Isaacson Iron Works) (But NOT Isaacson Structural Steel, different company as best as I can tell) was manufacturing large bore naval guns (Rifled and smooth) for the US before WWI. They were also the main west coast source source of ship and submarine main shafts, some of which were more than ten feet in diameter and over a hundred feet long, particularly those that incorporated engine crank and drive shaft as a single unified piece.

There are some very cool photos of the lathe used to produce these shafts. The operators station was mounted on the crossfeed and he rode along with the tool as it traveled back and forth turning down the shaft. Unbelievably massive lathes! The shafts were so long that they had to be heat treated in sections with a fire house that moved down the length of the shaft, rather than moving the shaft through the oven.
Flying the Crimson Skies

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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Carthaginian » Sun Apr 07, 2013 12:27 am

Thom wroteColonIsaacson Steel of Seattle WA (AKA Isaacson Iron Works) (But NOT Isaacson Structural Steel, different company as best as I can tell) was manufacturing large bore naval guns (Rifled and smooth) for the US before WWI. They were also the main west coast source source of ship and submarine main shafts, some of which were more than ten feet in diameter and over a hundred feet long, particularly those that incorporated engine crank and drive shaft as a single unified piece.

There are some very cool photos of the lathe used to produce these shafts. The operators station was mounted on the crossfeed and he rode along with the tool as it traveled back and forth turning down the shaft. Unbelievably massive lathes! The shafts were so long that they had to be heat treated in sections with a fire house that moved down the length of the shaft, rather than moving the shaft through the oven.


Well, there was a difference between the older guns and the ones that were being built during the World Wars.
The big 12", 14" and 16" rifles were extremely complex when compared to some of the earlier guns. Brooke and Dahlgren guns were just a matter of hooping in the right place or figuring the right reduction of thickness during casting. Heck, the Confederacy made Brooke rifles not far from where i grew up under very primitive conditions. The finishing work on the newer pieces was extremely complex. I know that by the middle of WWII that a lot of companies were 'preforging' parts for naval guns (specifically, the 12"/L50 Mk8 on the Alaska class) and shipping them to the NGF, but I haven't heard of anyone else making finished product for modern naval rifles.

If there were other centers of big bore naval rifle production on the West Coast, they would suffer from the lack of availability of steel I mentioned earlier. Pacifica and Hollywood are totally cut off from any steel production, and would have to import- probably from overseas sources. Really, if it didn't come from Dixie, Appalachia or the Empire State... well, you're not getting 'domestic' steel.

By the 40's, some autofretted monoblock barrels were coming into play- and those are simpler to make, thought they take some really specialized equipment.
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.

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Re: Confederate Naval Vessels

Postby Carthaginian » Sun Apr 21, 2013 11:43 pm

A light cruiser based on the Omaha class hull, but with improvements.
The Little Rock class has the same hull as the former USN's light cruisers; however their silhouette differs as the former has a pair of large trunked funnels, while the latter has four thin funnels in a manner similar to the famous 'four piper' destroyers. Additionally, the Little Rock and her sisters also feature their entire main armament in rotating twin gunhouses- two forward and two aft. This gives them the same broadside as the earlier USN cruisers, but removes the awkward casemated guns of the Omaha. Finally, the Confederate Navy's adaptation of the design is a fair bit slower- 31.5 knots versus almost 35 knots- in order to avoid the hull strain from the oversized plant of the Omaha class. It also allows for more complete armor coverage- meaning that the magazines of the newer vessels are more well protected than their older 'cousins.'

The Little Rock went to sea for trials in 1936, and back into the yards for some minor alterations after shakedown, entering service officially in October of 1936. Her sisters were similarly altered while still in fitting out; this slightly increased their yard time, but both are currently undergoing sea trials and are expected to enter active service in 1938.

Little Rock, Confederation of Dixie Light Cruiser laid down 1932

Displacement:
7,188 t light; 7,458 t standard; 8,259 t normal; 8,899 t full load

Dimensions: Length (overall / waterline) x beam x draught (normal/deep)
(575.00 ft / 575.00 ft) x 55.00 ft x (20.00 / 21.10 ft)
(175.26 m / 175.26 m) x 16.76 m x (6.10 / 6.43 m)

Armament:
8 - 6.00" / 152 mm 53.0 cal guns - 105.01lbs / 47.63kg shells, 200 per gun
Breech loading guns in deck and hoist mounts, 1932 Model
4 x Twin mounts on centreline ends, evenly spread
2 raised mounts - superfiring
4 - 3.00" / 76.2 mm 23.0 cal guns - 13.01lbs / 5.90kg shells, 350 per gun
Anti-air guns in deck mounts, 1913 Model
2 x Single mounts on sides, forward deck aft
2 x Single mounts on sides, aft deck forward
12 - 0.50" / 12.7 mm 39.0 cal guns - 0.09lbs / 0.04kg shells, 2,500 per gun
Machine guns in deck mounts, 1926 Model
6 x Twin mounts on sides, evenly spread
6 double raised mounts
Weight of broadside 893 lbs / 405 kg

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 3.00" / 76 mm 375.00 ft / 114.30 m 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Main Belt covers 100 % of normal length

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 1.50" / 38 mm 1.00" / 25 mm 1.50" / 38 mm

- Armoured deck - multiple decks:
For and Aft decks: 1.50" / 38 mm
Forecastle: 1.50" / 38 mm Quarter deck: 1.50" / 38 mm

- Conning towers: Forward 3.00" / 76 mm, Aft 3.00" / 76 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 70,000 shp / 52,220 Kw = 31.57 kts
Range 7,050nm at 15.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 1,441 tons

Complement:
433 - 563

Cost:
£2.933 million / $11.733 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 238 tons, 2.9 %
- Guns: 238 tons, 2.9 %
Armour: 1,390 tons, 16.8 %
- Belts: 733 tons, 8.9 %
- Armament: 36 tons, 0.4 %
- Armour Deck: 568 tons, 6.9 %
- Conning Towers: 53 tons, 0.6 %
Machinery: 2,066 tons, 25.0 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 3,074 tons, 37.2 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 1,071 tons, 13.0 %
Miscellaneous weights: 420 tons, 5.1 %
- Hull below water: 200 tons
- Hull above water: 200 tons
- On freeboard deck: 20 tons

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
10,021 lbs / 4,546 Kg = 92.8 x 6.0 " / 152 mm shells or 1.4 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.13
Metacentric height 2.6 ft / 0.8 m
Roll period: 14.4 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 70 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.36
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1.27

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck,
a normal bow and a cruiser stern
Block coefficient (normal/deep): 0.457 / 0.467
Length to Beam Ratio: 10.45 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 23.98 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 54 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 55
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 0.00 degrees
Stern overhang: 0.00 ft / 0.00 m
Freeboard (% = length of deck as a percentage of waterline length):
Fore end, Aft end
- Forecastle: 20.00 %, 30.00 ft / 9.14 m, 22.00 ft / 6.71 m
- Forward deck: 30.00 %, 22.00 ft / 6.71 m, 17.00 ft / 5.18 m
- Aft deck: 35.00 %, 17.00 ft / 5.18 m, 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
- Quarter deck: 15.00 %, 16.00 ft / 4.88 m, 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
- Average freeboard: 19.07 ft / 5.81 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 98.7 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 159.6 %
Waterplane Area: 20,290 Square feet or 1,885 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 119 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 93 lbs/sq ft or 452 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0.98
- Longitudinal: 1.49
- Overall: 1.02
Adequate machinery, storage, compartmentation space
Excellent accommodation and workspace room
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform
Good seaboat, rides out heavy weather easily

Little Rock
St. Louis
Charleston
Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up lest worse than death befall you!
To arms, to arms, to arms in Dixie.


All my planes are made with parts from: http://www.toposolitario.com/workshop/crimsonskies.html.


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